Pain Relief for Rotator Cuff Tears–Introducing the Stryker InSpace Balloon

What is a Rotator Cuff Tear?

The rotator cuff is a group of four tendons that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint, connecting the muscles of the upper arm to the shoulder blade. When a rotator cuff tear occurs–from acute trauma, repetitive stress, or degeneration over time–the tendon becomes separated from its attachment point on the bone. Rotator cuff tears are painful and cause weakness in the joint and limited shoulder mobility. Common symptoms of a tear include difficulty lifting your arm, a popping or crackling sensation in the shoulder, and pain both at rest and with movement.

Unfortunately, rotator cuff tears don’t heal on their own. If an untreated tear results in arthritis in the joint, patients often require shoulder replacement surgery, but for patients who still have shoulder function and haven’t developed arthritis, there is a less invasive treatment option called the Stryker InSpace Balloon.

What is the Stryker InSpace Balloon?

The Stryker InSpace Balloon is a medical device used to treat rotator cuff tears. It’s made of biocompatible material–a substance that can be implanted in the body and tolerated without damaging existing tissue. The balloon creates more space within the subacromial area–the space between the bone at the top of the shoulder and the ball of the shoulder–reducing compression and friction caused by the torn rotator cuff.

What’s involved in the procedure?

The Stryker InSpace Balloon is placed arthroscopically, using a small incision and the guidance of a camera to precisely place the deflated balloon in the subacromial space. The balloon is then inflated with a sterile saline solution, causing it to push the acromion away from the rotator cuff tendons. This reduces impingement on the injured tissues to restore function and alleviate pain.

The procedure is minimally invasive and performed on an outpatient basis. Recovery time varies, depending on the individual patient and the extent of the injury, and rehabilitation may include physical therapy to help restore strength and mobility in the shoulder.

How do I know if the Stryker InSpace Balloon can help me?  

If you’re experiencing shoulder pain, or have been diagnosed with a rotator cuff tear, it’s important to consult with a shoulder specialist as soon as possible. The specialist will evaluate your injury and medical history, and may recommend the Stryker InSpace Balloon procedure as a treatment option.

Below is our Q&A with Dr. Noerdlinger, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in the shoulder. Dr. Noerdlinger is a partner at Atlantic Orthopaedics with extensive experience performing the Stryker InSpace Balloon procedure.

Q: In your own words, how does this procedure benefit your patients? 
A: This is a pain relieving procedure.

Q: Who is a good candidate for the Stryker InSpace Balloon procedure?
A: The procedure is indicated for patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, with good shoulder function and minimal to no arthritis.

Q: Where do you perform this procedure? 
A: I perform the procedure at NECOS (New England Center for Orthopaedic Surgery) in Portsmouth, and York Hospital in Maine.

Q: Do you have a recent patient success story you can share?
A: I performed the Stryker InSpace Balloon procedure on a 67 year old man with years of pain and an unfixable rotator cuff tear. He described his shoulder as getting worse despite physical therapy and injections. He had pain with an active range of motion, and stated his shoulder was 30% normal. Four months after his February surgery, he described his pain as a 2 out of 10 on a daily basis and rated his shoulder as 60% normal.

I also treated a 73 year old female patient who came to me with pain from an irreparable rotator cuff tear. She described her shoulder as 40% normal before the procedure and 70% normal 3 months after her March 1st surgery.

Another patient, a 60 year old man with bilateral irreparable rotator cuff tears, had the balloon placed in his right shoulder on March 1st, and his shoulder improved from 20% normal to 65% normal in 6 weeks. He then underwent left shoulder balloon placement May 10th.

Q: Anything else you’d like current or future patients to know about this procedure and how it would benefit them?
A: The rotator cuff is the one structure that, when torn, causes the most pain and dysfunction in the shoulder. Rotator cuff tears do not heal, get bigger over time, become unfixable, and cause arthritis. Rotator cuff repair surgery is very successful and can restore normal, pain-free function.

If the rotator cuff is irreparable, the painful shoulder is often treated with a reverse shoulder replacement. For patients with unfixable, painful rotator cuff tears with little to no arthritis and good function, an InSpace balloon is a good option. 

If you’re suffering from shoulder pain from a rotator cuff tear that hasn’t responded to treatments like injections or physical therapy, schedule an appointment to find out if the Stryker InSpace Balloon procedure is right for you.

Running person icon to the left of the image and to the right is the blog title: What is Collagen Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair?

What is Collagen Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair?

Rotator cuff injuries are one of the most common causes of shoulder pain, affecting more than 2 million Americans each year. If you have a partially torn rotator cuff that hasn’t responded to non-surgical treatment like physical therapy and cortisone injections, you may be a candidate for a procedure called Collagen Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair, performed by our shoulder specialist Dr. Noerdlinger.

What is the rotator cuff?
Shoulders are not singular joints, but rather a complex arrangement of bones, cartilage, ligaments, muscles, and tendons. The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles, connected by tendons, that originate from the shoulder blade (scapula) and attach to the upper arm bone (humerus) to form a cover, or “cuff.” The rotator cuff provides stability to the shoulder joint and helps the arm lift and rotate. 

What causes a rotator cuff tear?
A rotator cuff tear happens when the tendons pull away from the bone. With a partial tear, the tendon remains attached to the bone and with a full tear it separates from the bone completely. Tears most commonly happen as a result of normal wear and tear due to aging, with people over 40 at greatest risk. A tear can also be caused by an acute injury like a fall, from repetitive shoulder movement from jobs like carpentry or painting, or from sports like tennis or rowing. Untreated, a rotator cuff tear can worsen over time and may lead to chronic shoulder pain and limited range of motion.

How do I know if I have a rotator cuff tear?
The most common symptom of a rotator cuff tear is pain. A tear can also cause weakness in the arm and shoulder, difficulty raising your arm or lifting something, and a clicking or popping sensation in the shoulder. You may also experience swelling or tenderness in the shoulder joint. If you think you have a rotator cuff tear, a doctor will need to perform a physical exam and may confirm your diagnosis with an x-ray, MRI, or ultrasound.

What is Collagen Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair?
Collagen augmented rotator cuff repair is a surgical technique that uses a collagen implant to reinforce the rotator cuff repair. The implant is made of a biologically derived material similar to the collagen found in human tissue. It’s designed to provide additional strength and support to the healing tendon, reducing the risk of re-tear. The postage-size collagen patches are absorbed by the body within about 6 months, and patients generally experience shorter recovery times than with conventional rotator cuff surgery.

We recently sat down with shoulder specialist Dr. Noerdlinger and asked him a few questions about this procedure. 

Q: How does this procedure benefit your patients?
A: Collagen implants can lead to quicker recoveries. Adding collagen facilitates the biologic healing of torn tendons in certain situations. They are used in two situations:

  • To repair a partially torn rotator cuff tendon. In this scenario, the collagen is laid on top of the partially torn tendon. The implant blends in with the thinned rotator cuff tendon, thickens it and allows it to heal. Patients, with partial tears, do not need to wear a sling after surgery.
  • To augment a repaired shredded tendon that may not heal on its own, particularly in the setting of a revision rotator cuff tear when the tendon did not heal after the first surgery. 

Q: Who is a good candidate for the Collagen Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair Procedure?
A: Not everyone is a candidate for this procedure. Patients with irreparable rotator tears would not qualify for this procedure. Also, patients with good tissue may not need to augment their repairs. 

Q: Where do you perform the Collagen Augmented Rotator Cuff Repair procedure?
A: The procedure requires anesthesia and is performed arthroscopically at NECOS and York Hospital.

Q: Can you tell us about a success story? 
A: I recently saw a 56 year old female with worsening constant shoulder pain since April 2022. I performed a Partial Rotator Cuff Repair with collagen implant in January of 2023. She was seen in early March of 2023 and reported to be doing well with minimal complaints of pain. 

NOTE: Shoulder surgery has a long recovery and often people take 4-6 months before they feel great. Having an expert shoulder surgeon like Dr. Noerdlinger may help speed up recovery. 

NH Magazine names 8 AOSM Surgeons Top Docs!

NH Magazine Announces 2023 Top Docs

Each year, over 3,000 licensed New Hampshire physicians nominate their peers for the opportunity to receive the honor of ‘Top Doctor.’ Those named Top Doctors received the greatest number of recommendations within 55+ specialties, and the results are in! We think all of our docs are top, but this year, eight of our physicians were voted ‘Top Doctor,’ including:

Glen Crawford, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
Robert Eberhart, MD* – Top Doctor for Hand Surgery
Andrew McMahon, DO – Top Doctor for Sports Medicine
Mayo Noerdlinger, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
H. Matthew Quitkin, MD – Top Doctor for Hand Surgery
Akhilesh Sastry, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
William Sutherland, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
Tyler Welch, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery

Congratulations to all the 2023 Top Doctors!

Learn more about our providers in Portsmouth, NH and York, ME HERE. Or click HERE to make an appointment with our orthopaedic and sports medicine team.

*As of January 1, 2023 Dr. Robert Eberhart officially retired.

NH Magazine Names AOSM Doctors, 2022 Top Docs

2022 Top Docs

Each year, over 3,000 licensed New Hampshire physicians nominate their peers for the opportunity to receive the honor of ‘Top Doctor.’ Those named Top Doctors received the greatest number of recommendations within 55+ specialties, and the results are in! We think all of our docs are top, but this year, seven of our physicians were voted ‘Top Doctor,’ including:
(Pictured below from left to right)

Glen Crawford, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
Robert Eberhart, MD – Top Doctor for Hand Surgery
Andy McMahon, DO – Top Doctor for Sports Medicine
Mayo Noerdlinger, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
H. Matthew Quitkin, MD – Top Doctor for Hand Surgery
Akhilesh Sastry, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery
William Sutherland, MD – Top Doctor for Orthopaedic Surgery

Congratulations to all the 2022 Top Doctors!

Learn more about our providers in Portsmouth, NH and York, ME HERE. Or click HERE to make an appointment with our orthopaedic and sports medicine team.

AOSM Physicians Named 2020 Top Orthopaedic Surgeons in NH

We’re so happy to announce that Dr. Sastry, Dr. Noerdlinger and Dr. Quitkin were named 2020 Top Orthopaedic Surgeons in New Hampshire Magazine.

Each year, thousands of physicians licensed to practice in New Hampshire are asked to nominate specialists they would most recommend to family and friends. Those selected as Top Doctors’ received the greatest number of recommendations within 57 specialties and are recognized for their skills and caring.

Their hard work and dedication to their patients is truly appreciated.

First In Maine!

Dr. Mayo Noerdlinger, Board-Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon and provider at Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, recently became the first surgeon in Maine to perform a computer navigated stemless total shoulder replacement using ExactechGPS-guided technology, an innovative new procedure for shoulder replacement. Already one of the top shoulder surgeons in the Northeast.

Dr. Noerdlinger and his patients continue to benefit from this new technology, a major advancement in shoulder replacement. Dr. Noerdlinger also performed the first GPS-guided total shoulder surgery at York Hospital, the first hospital in the Northeast to purchase ExactechGPS.

ExactechGPS shoulder replacement, also called ExactechGPS Shoulder Application, improves the precision and predictability of shoulder surgery from preoperative planning to real-time execution. This new technology helps the surgeon better understand his or her patient’s anatomy before entering the operating room, and during surgery ExactechGPS provides a real-time view of the implant placement process and guides the surgeon toward any necessary adjustments.

“The shoulder replacement technology keeps getting better, allowing the surgeon to reproduce the patient’s anatomy in a more minimally invasive and bone sparing manner,” said Noerdlinger. “By replicating the patient’s anatomy, we anticipate the functional outcomes will improve and the recovery times will shorten. As life expectancies increase, the longevity of joint replacements becomes more and more of an important issue. Shoulder replacements are thought to last 15-20 years before patients might develop pain needing revision surgery. With the stemless design, there is less metal going into the bone, which will make future surgeries easier to perform. This new design is a particularly attractive option for younger patients undergoing shoulder replacement surgery.”

Mayo Noerdlinger, MD, FAAOS, CIME, specializes in orthopedic, reconstructive and arthroscopic surgery; shoulder surgery and replacement; reverse shoulder replacement; treatment of torn tendons and ligaments; sports medicine and others. He is also the physician behind Seacoast Shoulder, which offers patients the latest in state-of-the-art treatment for shoulder ailments of all kinds. Visit www.atlanticorthopaedics.org for more information, or call 603.431.1121.

Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a group of Board-Certified physicians who utilize the latest concepts in orthopaedics and sports medicine, coupled with preventive and surgical techniques. For more information, visit www.atlanticorthopaedics.org, or call the Portsmouth clinic at 603.431.1121.

York Hospital‘s surgery center mixes advanced technology with personalized care in a comfortable, and caring environment. The center is equipped with five surgical suites staffed by a dedicated and highly trained team of specialists that care for patients preoperatively, during surgery and in recovery. Our center is well-equipped with the latest advances in technology and instrumentation for the more than 6,500 surgical procedures annually. For more information, visit yorkhospital.com or call 207-351-2385.

York Hospital Using New Shoulder Replacement Technology

YORK, Maine – Dr. Mayo Noerdlinger looks up at a computer screen above his head during a shoulder replacement surgery one recent morning at York Hospital. A 3-D image of the patient’s shoulder system floats on the screen, an image that has been created preoperatively and allows him to decide in advance how he wants to proceed during surgery.

Soon, a GPS probe is placed in the patient’s bone, picking up the contours of her shoulder and matching that to the image taken before surgery. As Noerdlinger works to put the pins in the bone to hold the replacement piece in place, he is guided by the probe to place them precisely where they need to go, down to the millimeter. No chance they will be put in “cockeyed.”

Noerdlinger said the technology represents the next and important step in the evolution of shoulder operations. York Hospital is the first hospital in the Northeast to offer this kind of technologically-guided surgery, and has been offering them since June.

“I definitely think there’s value in having a doctor who has experience and who has done a lot of surgeries,” said Noerdlinger, an orthopedic surgeon with Atlantic Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in Portsmouth. “But even a person who does a lot of them may have an off day. A lot of experienced surgeons look at this technology and say, ‘Yeah, yeah, you’re not going to get better than surgical experience.’ But I think that there’s a little hubris in that.”

Noerdlinger certainly qualifies as an experienced surgeon. He has been a practicing physician for 15 years, and in the Seacoast area is the go-to-guy for shoulders. He said shoulder surgery has seen advances over the years. Where once there were one-size-fits-all components, today components are size-specific for each patient. This “has indeed led to getting good to excellent results for 15 to 20 years. But can we do better?”

He said when he was shown the equipment created by the company ExactechGPS, which allows those pins to be placed accurately in the bone, he saw the next logical step in perfecting patient outcome. “I’ll be honest with you. I’m not sure that putting in the components perfectly will make a difference. But it makes common sense,” he said, that perfect placement of the pins could allow the replacement shoulder to last five to 10 years longer. “I think this is a game changer.”

Shoulder problems are typically caused when the cartilage that protects the shoulder bones has worn down due to years of motion and pressure. This causes arthritis, most typically osteoarthritis, but also rheumatoid arthritis. Patients also can be suffering from bursitis.

Not all people with shoulder issues are candidates for total replacement. Many issues can be repaired through arthroscopic surgery, Noerdlinger said. For instance, most people he sees have a rotator cuff tear that can be handled through a shoulder arthroscopy. Many patients choose cortisone or similar treatments that will stave off the pain for a period of time, rather than go through surgery at all.

He said he sees people in their 30s and 40s who have shoulder issues, but can deal with it through a variety of treatments including cortisone – and yoga. “Staying flexible is key,” he said. “But by the time they’re in their 50s and 60s, they’re tired of it. They say, ‘I don’t want to live with it and I’ve had all the cortisone injections I want to have.’”

The ExactechGPS system begins to work at his office, he said. Patients who decide on replacement will get a CAT scan, which the company turns into a 3-D image. With this image, Noerdlinger can come up with a game plan specifically geared for the individual patient. He said this is particularly helpful when preparing for a reverse shoulder replacement – when the ball at the end of the humerus bone is cut off and a metal ball is attached to the upper arm bone – essentially reversing the shoulder system. This is done when there is a large rotator cuff tear. Rather than the rotator cuff, the deltoid muscle will power the arm.

Armed with patient-specific information, he goes into surgery, where he places a probe into the shoulder blade that will allow him to place the ball component exactly in the right place and pin it into the bone precisely. And it’s all on the computer screen in front of him.

He said creating the hole for the probe, or tracker, “does add to surgical time, and that’s more anesthesia. But I’ve found the typical increase in surgical time is four minutes. That’s worth it to put those pins in perfect position. I started performing these at the end of June, and this is my ninth. There have been no negative outcomes. Everyone is doing well.”

Noerdlinger credits York Hospital President Jud Knox and the hospital Board of Trustees for listening to him when he approached them about acquiring the machine. “It’s an expense that the hospital took on themselves, and they do not pass on to the patient,” he said. “Our practice has a great relationship with the hospital, and they always said, if you want something let us know. This was the first time I went to the hospital, and they listened to me.”

Noerdlinger said he is waiting for Portsmouth Hospital, where he is Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, to get the same machine, but because the hospital is part of a larger, for-profit corporation, “there’s a lot of machinations. York Hospital made a decision in a week. This hospital said, ‘Why not do it?’”

This is not the first high-tech machine that the hospital has acquired. Since early 2016, the hospital has offered knee replacement surgery using a similar technological system that marries preoperative images with operation images. In both cases, York Hospital was the first in the region to offer these technologies.

Knox said much of the hospital’s decision-making comes down to the relationship with the doctor and the outcome for the patient.

“I don’t think being the first in the region is a risk for us if, one, we have a great relationship with the physician who’s promoting the technology and, two, if the evidence is available to show the efficacy of the technique,” he said. “And whatever we’re talking about, we try to figure out if it has value for patients.”

Unlike knee replacement surgery – estimated by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons at some 900,000 a year nationwide – only about 56,000 shoulder replacement surgeries are performed annually. “It’s a non-weight-bearing joint, unlike knees and hips,” said Noerdlinger. “The question is, how much money should be spent to make someone’s life better? That analysis is above my pay grade. I believe this will allow people to have a better long-term outcome. I can’t monetize that value. But I do feel passionate about this.”

“When you look at the disability caused by shoulder problems, it’s huge. When people can’t put on their shirt or tie their shoes, that’s an issue,” said Knox. “We won’t do as many shoulders as knees, but the numbers don’t mean those shoulder operations are not important. There is not a single number of frequency that we use to measure whether we do a procedure or not.”

According to Noerdlinger, York Hospital is among a rarified few that have embraced this technology. There are only five major medical centers that have this machine in operation or are in the process of setting it up, including Stanford University Medical Center, the Cleveland Clinic and the Hospital of Joint Disease at New York University. It is also widely used in Spain, France, England and Australia. Few small hospitals are using the technology.

“The significance is York Hospital’s relationships with patients and their physicians,” said Knox. “Hopefully that’s our strength and hopefully that’s what helps us be a success in the land of medical care giants. All hospitals are trying to do a good job. All hospitals are asking what is the right technology to do the best thing for our patients.”

“I do not see these technologies as economic lifesavers. I don’t think that works,” he said. “When all is said and done, it’s going to be whether people believe York Hospital is doing the right thing for their well-being.”

As of November 2017, Portsmouth Regional Hospital has obtained the GPS technology a allowing patients access to the same benefits in Portsmouth.

To view the article on Seacoast Online, visit http://www.fosters.com/news/20170828/york-hospital-using-new-shoulder-replacement-technology.  

Dr. Noerdlinger of Atlantic Orthopaedics Leads the Northeast in Shoulder Surgery

York, ME – Dr. Mayo Noerdlinger, Board-Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon and provider at Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, recently became the first surgeon in the Northeast to perform a shoulder replacement surgery using ExactechGPS-guided technology, an innovative new procedure for shoulder replacement. Already one of the top shoulder surgeons in the Northeast, Dr. Noerdlinger and his patients will benefit even more with this new technology, a major advancement in shoulder replacement. Dr. Noerdlinger performed his first surgery of this procedure at York Hospital, the first hospital in the Northeast to purchase ExactechGPS. This was the premier surgical case north of the Mason-Dixon line of the Mid-Atlantic.

ExactechGPS shoulder replacement, also called ExactechGPS Shoulder Application, improves the precision and predictability of shoulder surgery from preoperative planning to real-time execution. This new technology helps the surgeon better understand his or her patient’s anatomy before entering the operating room, and while during surgery ExactechGPS provides a real-time view of the implant placement process and guides the surgeon toward any necessary adjustments.

“ExactechGPS gives us much more flexibility when it comes to treating shoulder pain operatively,” Dr. Noerdlinger said. “Without a doubt, surgeons will be able to operate more precisely thanks to the computer navigation, which will decrease complication and speed up recovery for our patients.”

Mayo Noerdlinger, MD, FAAOS, CIME, specializes in orthopedic, reconstructive and arthroscopic surgery; shoulder surgery and replacement; reverse shoulder replacement; treatment of torn tendons and ligaments; sports medicine and others. He is also the physician behind Seacoast Shoulder, which offers patients the latest in state-of-the-art treatment for shoulder ailments of all kinds. Visit www.seacoastshoulder.com for more information, or call 603.431.1121 or 207.363.3490.

Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a group of Board-Certified physicians who utilize the latest concepts in orthopaedics and sports medicine, coupled with preventive and surgical techniques. For more information, visit www.atlanticorthopaedics.org, or call the Portsmouth clinic at 603.431.1121.

Dr. Noerdlinger Named One of NH Magazine’s Top Doctors

Portsmouth, NH – Dr. Mayo Noerdlinger, Board-Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon and provider at Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, was recently named a Top Orthopaedic Surgeon in New Hampshire Magazine’s list of 2017 Top Doctors.

 

Dr. Noerdlinger joins 273 leading physicians in 55 specialties across New Hampshire, nominated by their peers in a wide range of medical needs, from pediatrics to surgical care. Health-care research and information company Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. conducted the survey process, whose research, screening and selection carefully chose top doctors for traits like medical specialty, educational and professional experience, and dedication to their patients.

 

“I’m so honored and humbled to be recognized among the state’s leading physicians,” said Dr. Noerdlinger. “I always hope my patients leave the practice feeling truly cared for, and that their needs were listened to throughout the treatment process. It’s what I love to do, and I’m glad my peers can see that shining through.”

 

Dr. Noerdlinger, MD, FAAOS, CIME, specializes in orthopedic, reconstructive and arthroscopic surgery; shoulder surgery and replacement; reverse shoulder replacement; treatment of torn tendons and ligaments; sports medicine and others. He is a member of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Portsmouth Regional Hospital, the Medical Director of ProCare Physical Therapy & Hand Center and of Hampton Physical Therapy, and a Team Physician at Wells High School and the University of New Hampshire.

 

Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a group of Board-Certified physicians who utilize the latest concepts in orthopaedics and sports medicine, coupled with preventive and surgical techniques. For more information, visit www.atlanticorthopaedics.org, or call the Portsmouth clinic at 603.431.1121.

Dr. Noerdlinger Speaks at Portsmouth Regional Hospital

Dr. Mayo Noerdlinger, Board-Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon and provider at Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, will be leading a discussion titled Advancement and Treatment of Arthritis and Pain in the Shoulder on Monday, October 3rd from 7-8:30PM. The lecture will be held at Portsmouth Regional Hospital, located at 333 Borthwick Ave.

Dr. Noerdlinger will educate his audience on advancements in both surgical and non-surgical treatments in orthopaedics and sports medicine. He will also speak to the difference between standard and reverse shoulder replacements, including the indication and recovery period for each method.

Light refreshments will be provided at the event. It is free to the public; however, reservations are recommended. To register, call (888) 421-1080, or visit https://portsmouthhospital.secure.ehc.com/calendar.

Dr. Noerdlinger, MD, FAAOS, CIME, specializes in orthopaedic, reconstructive and arthroscopic surgery; shoulder surgery and replacement; reverse shoulder replacement; treatment of torn tendons and ligaments; and sports medicine. He is a member of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Portsmouth Regional Hospital, the Medical Director of ProCare Physical Therapy & Hand Center and a Team Physician at Wells High School and the University of New Hampshire. He received his BS at Amherst College in Massachusetts and his MD at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.

Dr. Mayo Noerdlinger Speaks about Shoulder Pain

Mayo Noerdlinger, MD, FAAOS, a board certified orthopaedic surgeon with Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, will present a free lecture on Shoulder Pain, Wednesday September 16th at Noon at the York Public Library.

Dr. Noerdlinger is a shoulder specialist and will discuss “Relief from Shoulder Pain” at the library. If you’re having shoulder pain and want to learn more about the latest, innovative, non-operative treatment for common to complex shoulder ailments– this lecture is for you. Visit Dr. Noerdlinger’s website: SeacoastShoulder.com for more information on shoulder pain and diagnoses.

Dr. Noerdlinger received his M.D. from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and is the recipient of two fellowships: Sports Medicine & Shoulder Surgery Fellowship from Rush Medical College in Chicago and an Orthopaedic Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery Fellowship from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a group of Board Certified physicians who enjoy full medical staff privileges at Portsmouth Regional Hospital and York Hospital. Several of the Physicians are Fellowship trained in Joint Replacement, Hand Surgery, Shoulder Surgery and Sports Trauma/Reconstructive Surgery. More information is at atlanticorthopaedics.org

Atlantic Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine